Canada
Contact
Veolia Water Technologies Canada

Corporate Headquarters
4105 Sartelon
St-Laurent, QC
H4S 2B3
Canada

T. (514) 334-7230
F. (514) 334-5070

Ontario Office
2000 Argentia Road
Plaza IV, Suite 430
Mississauga, ON
L5N 1W1
Canada

T. (905) 286-4846
F. (905) 286-0488

British Columbia Office
3138 Brookridge Drive,
North Vancouver, BC
V7R 3A8
Canada

T. (604) 562-0301

Articles

Years : All years
Number of items : 17

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Simple and efficient multi-stage stormwater flow control

Managing stormwater flow for a range of events with one control device is not always possible or efficient, yet several municipalities require flow regulation for five to 100-year storm events

Improving an induced vortex grit chamber using Computational Fluid Dynamics

The headworks of a wastewater treatment plant is not only the first step of the wastewater treatment process, but also an essential one, as it sets the tone for overall treatment performance.

A Green, Sustainable, Sefl-Sufficient Wastewater Treatment Plant: the Upcoming (R)evolution

As municipalities and industries strive towards sustainable development, the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is on the verge of being entirely transformed.

Treatment Tech Combos: The one, two, three punch.

Population growth and stricter treatment and discharge regulations are forcing wastewater treatment plants in urban and high-growth areas to consider expanding or upgrading their systems. All too often, these new discharge limits require a complete rethinking of the wastewater process, with all the complexities that it may involve and new regulations that might be put in place.

Small (wastewater treatment plant) is beautiful

Population growth and stricter discharge regulations are forcing wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban and high-growth areas to consider expanding or upgrading their treatment systems. These plant expansions often require extra land, where, sometimes, none is available. Also, expanding the WWTP may mean infringing on pristine land or already occupied land (farmland, reserve, etc.), making the expansion a bureaucratic nightmare.

Novel processes for reducing phosphorus and SS levels down to tertiary discharge standards

Large population increases in rural areas, stricter discharge regulations, blue-green algae blooms and high phosphorus loads in watersheds are forcing wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) to consider upgrading their systems to include tertiary treatment of phosphorus.

Small Footprint Technologies Combine For High-Rate Treatment Efficiency

Stricter treatment and discharge regulations are forcing wastewater treatment plants in urban and high-growth areas to consider expanding or upgrading their systems. The challenge? Even if extra land is available, it's often not affordable. Fortunately, certain small footprint technologies now provide efficient high-rate treatment.

A Compact and Efficient Technology for Upgrade of Canadian Municipal Aerated Lagoons

Aerated lagoons are extensively used throughout Canada for treatment of municipal wastewater. In fact, lagoons are, by far, the most popular wastewater treatment technology: they represent 67% of all existing WWTP's (wastewater treatment plants) across Canada.

How a global approach to wet weather can improve water quality

Wet weather issues have evolved greatly over the last generation. From a side issue 40 years ago, they have reached the forefront of environmental concerns. Initiatives such as the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement and directives from the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment indicate that stormwater and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) can no longer be considered as inoffensive as initially thought.

Special Treatment: City of Calgary Water Services

Unlike most large cities in Canada, which are subdivided into municipal districts, Calgary, Alberta, has a single municipal administration for its roughly one million people, and it supplies potable water to the city as well as some neighboring municipalities in the region. The city is also unique in that it has two water treatment plants located on two different water sources: the Bearspaw treatment plant is on the Bow River, and the Glenmore plant is on the Elbow River.

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